Episode 105: Building the Poem

Nicole Terez Dutton is a poet, teacher, and literary editor who also served as the first poet laureate of Somerville, MA. She says, “Ultimately, we’re building poems because we want to connect with each other.” Language particular to an experience can reinvigorate our interaction with and our relationship to language itself.

Nicole Terez DuttonNicole Terez Dutton‘s work has appeared in CallalooPloughshares32 PoemsIndiana Review and Salt Hill Journal. Nicole earned an MFA from Brown University and has received fellowships from the Frost Place, the Fine Arts Work Center, Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Her collection of poems, If One Of Us Should Fall, was selected as the winner of the 2011 Cave Canem Poetry Prize.

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Episode 101: An Emergence of the People, their Spirit, their Stories

L’Merchie Frazier is an artist and Director of Education and Interpretation for the Museum of African American History, Boston/Nantucket. Her work is centered on helping others to find their voice and discover their own innate creativity. She shares how her community projects aim to encourage people – individually and collectively – to participate in the arena of art-making.

L'Merchie FrazierL’Merchie Frazier, a public fiber artist, innovator, poet and holographer, is Director of Education and Interpretation for the Museum of African American History, Boston/Nantucket, engaged in highlighting and curating the Museum’s collection/exhibits, providing place-based education and interdisciplinary history programs, projects and lectures, most recently promoting STEM / STEAM education pedagogy, and manages Faculty/ Teachers’ Institutes and its extension, The Cross Cultural Classroom, a benefit marketed to independent education entities, municipalities and corporations.

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Episode 93: Creating Public Space for Community Health

Matthew Mazzotta is an artist and activist. His work utilizes – and fuels – community dialogue. Through the creation of public artwork and space, he aims to leave people with an experience that expands their view of where they live.

Matthew MazzottaMatthew Mazzotta works at the intersection of art, activism, and urbanism, focusing on the power of the built environment to shape our relationships and experiences. He is as much as an inventor as he is an activist using artistic sensibilities to bring real world issues into the social discourse and lead collective public imagining. His community-specific public projects integrate new forms of civic participation and social engagement into the built environment and reveal how the spaces we travel through and spend our time living within have the potential to become distinct sites for intimate, radical, and meaningful exchanges.

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Episode 90: Technology as an Expressive Medium

George Fifield, Director of Boston Cyberarts, says, “Anytime you have a technology which can create an expressive medium, artists are some of the first people there – after it’s invented – to really explore it, and to stretch it, and to see what it really can do.” He discusses the evolution of media arts and details some recent projects using augmented reality and artificial intelligence.

George FifieldGeorge Fifield is the founding director of Boston Cyberarts Inc., a nonprofit arts organization which programs numerous art and technology projects, including the Boston Cyberarts Gallery in Jamaica Plain and Art on the Marquee, on the 80 foot video marquee in front of the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center. In 2017, Boston Cyberarts curated The Augmented Landscape, large augmented reality sculptures at The Salem Maritime National Historic Site and other public artworks.

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Episode 82: The ART of Taking Risks

The American Repertory Theater’s Diane Paulus and Diane Borger share how they think about risk, and what it means to have “high tolerance for disequilibrium” that permeates the entire culture of an organization. By experimenting with doing things differently, they say artists and arts organizations actually develop muscle and an ability to stay afloat in “risky water.”

Photos of A.R.T. Terrie and Bradley Bloom Artistic Director Diane Paulus (r) and A.R.T. Executive Producer Diane Borger (l). Paulus' image by Susan Lapides.Diane Paulus is the Terrie and Bradley Bloom Artistic Director of the American Repertory Theater at Harvard University. A.R.T. directing credits include ExtraOrdinary, Jagged Little Pill (beginning on Broadway at the Broadhurst Theatre in November 2019), The White Card, In the Body of the World, Waitress (currently on Broadway at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre, on US national tour, and in London’s West End), Crossing, Finding Neverland, Witness Uganda, Pippin (Tony Award, Best Revival and Best Director; opening June 2019 in Tokyo, Japan), The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess (Tony Award, Best Revival; NAACP Award, Best Direction), Prometheus Bound, Death and the Powers: The Robots’ Opera, Best of Both Worlds, and The Donkey Show. Continue reading “Episode 82: The ART of Taking Risks”